Purple Martin Song: Bird Song, Bird Calling & Morning Vocalization

December 10, 2021 // 7 minute read

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If you’re ready to attract more purple martins to your yard, you must first figure out the types of songs they sing.

Luckily, this article will explain all of the different vocalizations of the purple martin species.

Purple martins are beautiful birds. They have a distinct look that is easy to spot, with their black and white plumage and long tails.

But, what makes them so unique? One thing, in particular, is the songs they make.

The calls of purple martins are melodic, clear, and loud, which is perfect for attracting mates. Purple martins also sing at dawn in the morning on a regular basis.

In this article, we’ll inform you about all the songs purple martins make.

Purple Martins Sing During Courtships

Purple martins are vocal during courtships, which is what makes them so distinct. Courtship songs occur in the springtime when purple martin males are searching for mates.

It’s also interesting to note that females don’t sing or produce calls while they’re nesting because their bodies go through a great deal of stress.

Females Will Sing a Chortle Song to Their Young

After the chicks fledge, females will begin to sing again. They’ll produce a chortle song that’s loud enough for their young to hear from high inside of trees.

This way, juveniles know how to call back if they’re ever separated from their parents.

If you’ve never heard this sound before then it may take some time to get used to it because it can be pretty shrill and startling at first.

Purple Martins Will Sing While Mating

Purple martins will also sing while they’re nesting or mating. However, their songs are very different during these two events.

They’ll produce a high-pitched whistle when they mate and then send out a slow trilling sound once they’ve finished breeding for the season.

The song that purple martins make is one of the most important aspects to consider because it can determine how likely you are to attract them into your backyard area.

It’s crucial to understand what makes this bird so unique before you decide whether or not you want it in your yard.

The calls of purple martin males aren’t only loud but melodic as well, making them easy to spot colonies and even from far away.

Purple Martins Sing the Loudest Every Morning

Purple martins sing the loudest every morning. If you’ve never heard these birds before, it may be surprising at first because they are so loud!

That’s why purple martin birdhouses have to have special screens on them.

Otherwise, their calls would drive everyone in your neighborhood insane.

Purple Martins Make Sounds When Fighting Over Territory

When two purple martins are fighting over territory, they’ll make different types of calls.

They’ll produce a rapid trill sound when defending their property from other birds. They may even go so far as to dive-bomb them.

However, it’s interesting that they rarely ever hit one another because they’re too high up in the air for that to happen.

Purple Martins Will Sound Off if They’re Stressed or in Danger

If you’ve been working hard to attract purple martins into your yard but they’re still not showing up, there may be a few different reasons why.

One thing that’s important to keep in mind is that these birds will sound off if their nests are being threatened or disturbed by humans. They’ll also do this when other animals come near them as well.

For example, raccoons have been known to climb onto tree branches and rip apart the nest of a purple martin female while she’s incubating eggs inside it.

Therefore, make sure no wild animals come anywhere close to where their housing is located. That way, the parents can focus on taking care of their chicks instead of defending themselves from predators.

Males Will Sometimes Click Their Bills Together When Competing for Mates

When male purple martins are competing for mates, they’ll sometimes click their bills together.

This is a type of aggressive display that’s meant to show other males how tough and dominant they are in the area.

In this way, it can be easy to tell if two birds have been fighting over territory or even just one lone bird who wants everyone else to know he’s ready for the mating season.

These calls may seem strange at first but once you’ve heard them enough times, it gets easier to recognize when these events happen throughout the day.

Juvenile Martins Will Make All Kinds of Sounds to Get Their Parents’ Attention

Juvenile martins will make all kinds of sounds to get their parents’ attention.

They’ll often be sounding off at night and during the day as well because they’re trying to build up a good repertoire for themselves.

When these young birds first leave the nest, there are certain calls that they can produce in order to let their mothers know that they need food or protection from predators, such as snapping noises.

However, once one bird has picked up on this sound then it may end up being widely imitated by other juveniles throughout an entire colony since it gives them away whenever danger is near.

Purple Martins Will Sing When Excited, Frightened, or Even Angry

Purple martins will sing when they’re excited. They may also do this if they’ve been frightened by a predator in the area or even an aggressive bird from another colony.

In some cases, birds have been known to attack other purple martin pairs who are nesting near them as well.

That’s why it’s important not to place your housing too close to another tree where you know there is already one of these structures because that can cause problems for everyone involved.

Purple Martin Songs Consist of Countless Syllables and Phrases

As a whole, the purple martin songs consist of countless syllables and phrases that are repeated over and over again.

These calls will often vary depending on where you live in North America but they’re usually what’s known as “sweet” or “chur-lee.”

For such small creatures, their sounds can be quite surprising to hear up close because there is so much variety among them.

You may also see these birds making this type of noise at night if it’s mating season since there’ll be many males trying to get together with one female in order to produce offspring.

Females Will Sing When Laying Eggs and When Taking Care of Chicks

As for the female purple martins, they’ll typically sing when laying eggs and also while taking care of their chicks.

These songs are generally shorter than those made by males but it’s more common to hear them sounding off so keep your ears open.

Purple Martins Will Sing When Flying

Lastly, purple martins will sing when they’re flying.

Since these birds are so good at soaring through the sky and changing directions quickly, there’s a lot of communication that goes on between them while in the air.

For example, one bird might make some clicks or chirps to let others know where he is going next or how fast he’ll be traveling during his flight path.

Some may even sound off before taking off just to announce their arrival into an area once they come back down from another part of town later on in the day.

Explore More Purple Martin Songs

Purple martins are vocal, social animals. They make all kinds of noises when mating, nesting, and socializing with one another.

Knowing these songs can help you understand the behavior of these birds and find out if they’re in stress or danger.

Purple Martins Song
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